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Man's EstateLanded Gentry Masculinities, 1660-1900$
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Henry French and Mark Rothery

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199576692

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576692.001.0001

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Settled in the World: Marriage, Fatherhood, and the Reproduction of Male Identities

Settled in the World: Marriage, Fatherhood, and the Reproduction of Male Identities

Chapter:
(p.185) 4 Settled in the World: Marriage, Fatherhood, and the Reproduction of Male Identities
Source:
Man's Estate
Author(s):

Henry French

Mark Rothery

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199576692.003.0005

Chapter Four focuses on the role and perceptions of adults (particularly fathers) in shaping, adapting, and projecting societal stereotypes about appropriate masculine values. The chapter stresses that intergenerational conflicts over values were often muted or sublimated, because of the range of control mechanisms available to families, not least threats of dispossession of the family patrimony. The chapter argues that societal norms and stereotypes were often understood through Gentry families, and often by reference to their dynastic identities and traditions. As a result, it stresses the importance of this context in understanding how wider cultural norms or stereotypes might be received and articulated among this social segment, and the fact that this process was often more complex than is suggested within existing models of the cultural transmission of masculine values.

Keywords:   parenting, marriage, fatherhood, family life, patriarchy, dynastic values

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