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Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services$
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Diana H. Wall, Richard D. Bardgett, Valerie Behan-Pelletier, Jeffrey E. Herrick, T. Hefin Jones, Karl Ritz, Johan Six, Donald R. Strong, and Wim H. van der Putten

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199575923

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2013

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575923.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 12 November 2019

Biogeography and Phylogenetic Community Structure of Soil Invertebrate Ecosystem Engineers: Global to Local Patterns, Implications for Ecosystem Functioning and Services and Global Environmental Change Impacts

Biogeography and Phylogenetic Community Structure of Soil Invertebrate Ecosystem Engineers: Global to Local Patterns, Implications for Ecosystem Functioning and Services and Global Environmental Change Impacts

Chapter:
(p.201) Chapter 3.6 Biogeography and Phylogenetic Community Structure of Soil Invertebrate Ecosystem Engineers: Global to Local Patterns, Implications for Ecosystem Functioning and Services and Global Environmental Change Impacts
Source:
Soil Ecology and Ecosystem Services
Author(s):

Lijbert Brussaard

Duur K. Aanen

Maria J.I. Briones

Thibaud Decaëns

Gerlinde B. De Deyn

Tom M. Fayle

Samuel W. James

Tânia Nobre

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575923.003.0018

This chapter assesses the global-to-local scale geographical patterns of the diversity of soil invertebrate ecosystem engineers, beginning with an account of macroecological patterns in soil invertebrate community distributions. It then provides phylogeny-based accounts of biogeographic patterns of the major soil invertebrate engineer groups (i.e., termites, ants, earthworms, and enchytraeids), which leave physical traces on or in the soil (excrements, mounds, burrows, moved particles, and soil aggregates). Examples of phylogenetic community structure, i.e., the pattern of phylogenetic relatedness of species distributions within and among communities, at continental-to-local levels, are provided, and the possible effects of drivers of global environmental change on community composition and associated ecosystem functioning and services are explored. Following these group-specific sections, trait-based ecology of soil invertebrate ecosystem engineers is discussed more generally, with a view to the possible effects of global environmental change on ecosystem functioning and services.

Keywords:   biogeography, community structure, ecosystem engineer, geographical scale, phylogenetics, termites, ants, earthworms, enchytraeids, trait-based ecology

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