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Victorian Religious RevivalsCulture and Piety in Local and Global Contexts$
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David Bebbington

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199575480

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575480.001.0001

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The Struggle for the Soul of Texas

The Struggle for the Soul of Texas

Baptist Revival at Washington-on-the-Brazos, 1841

Chapter:
(p.53) 3 The Struggle for the Soul of Texas
Source:
Victorian Religious Revivals
Author(s):

David Bebbington

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199575480.003.0003

A revival took place at Washington-on-the-Brazos in the newly independent state of Texas in 1841. Nearly all the inhabitants of the small town attended, a high proportion became converts and the revival spread to adjacent places. The Baptists who promoted the awakening were successful in vanquishing the rough culture of the town. They brought the leading freethinkers of Washington to Christian allegiance. By accepting much of the thought of the Enlightenment, the moderate Baptists identified with the revival overcame their more traditional co-religionists who wanted nothing to do with organised missions or colleges. Yet the participants in the event resisted more extreme version of the Enlightenment embodied in the views of the Campbellites. The revival reveals much of the ideological struggle of the times to shape the future of Texas.

Keywords:   revival, Washington-on-the-Brazos, Texas, Baptists, rough culture, freethinkers, Enlightenment, Campbellites

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