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Childhood Obesity PreventionInternational Research, Controversies and Interventions$
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Jennifer A. O'Dea and Michael Eriksen

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199572915

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572915.001.0001

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Asian adolescents in New Zealand—a health promotion approach

Asian adolescents in New Zealand—a health promotion approach

Chapter:
(p.250) Chapter 22 Asian adolescents in New Zealand—a health promotion approach
Source:
Childhood Obesity Prevention
Author(s):

Shirin Foroughian

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572915.003.0022

Obesity was seen as a non-Asian phenomenon in New Zealand in the past, but research in recent years is suggesting a different picture. Obesity is characterized by the excessive accumulation of adipose tissue to an extent that health is impaired. Obesity in children and adolescents may have serious consequences, ranging from short-term physical and psychosocial consequences to long-term consequences that persist into adulthood (e.g. type 2 diabetes). The global increase in obesity is also evident in Asian populations, especially in those who have migrated to Western countries with obesity-promoting environments. High energy foods and lack of exercise along with many other factors, contribute to this weight gain. Bearing in mind that the majority of these factors are modifiable risk factors, early detection and intervention are very important in preventing excessive weight gain in such populations. This chapter discusses weight issues among Asians in New Zealand, as well as risk factors and suggestions for community development-type approaches to health promotion.

Keywords:   type 2 diabetes, Asians, overweight, New Zealand, children, culture, race, ethnic, community, public health

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