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Imperial Mines and Quarries in the Roman WorldOrganizational Aspects 27 BC-AD 235$
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Alfred Michael Hirt

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199572878

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572878.001.0001

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The Roman Army and Imperial Extractive Operations

The Roman Army and Imperial Extractive Operations

Chapter:
(p.168) 5 The Roman Army and Imperial Extractive Operations
Source:
Imperial Mines and Quarries in the Roman World
Author(s):

Alfred Michael Hirt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199572878.003.0005

Roman army officers and soldiers are documented in varying functions at imperial mines and quarries. From inscribed stone monuments set up at quarries and from labels on quarried blocks it emerges that centurions were transfered across the whole empire to take charge of particular quarrying operations. This chapter explores these particular practices and shines a light on the role the emperor plays in providing technical experts to extractive operations. Set aside these ‘specialists’ (who gained their experience during numerous provincial building ventures in which the Roman army assisted), the main job of soldiers in quarries was to provide security and, on occasion, auxiliary administrative services.

Keywords:   army, centurio, technical expertise, security, auxiliary services

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