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Political Imprisonment and the Irish, 1912-1921$
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William Murphy

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199569076

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199569076.001.0001

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‘Nowhere Else Does One Learn to Know a Colleague So Well’

‘Nowhere Else Does One Learn to Know a Colleague So Well’

May 1916–June 1917

Chapter:
(p.54) 3 ‘Nowhere Else Does One Learn to Know a Colleague So Well’
Source:
Political Imprisonment and the Irish, 1912-1921
Author(s):

William Murphy

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199569076.003.0004

This chapter explores the imprisonment of those interned and those convicted in the immediate aftermath of the Easter Rising of 1916. Given that these prisoners have received detailed attention, this chapter will provide an overview of the general pattern of their experiences, drawing on new material but also utilising the existing literature on Frongoch internment camp and the convicts. The chapter will argue that although the internees’ and convicts’ experiences were quite distinct, a common general pattern is discernible. In the first section the various phases of this pattern are explored, including the periods of conflict that developed between the authorities and both types of prisoner. The second section demonstrates that there was also a good deal of division among the prisoners. The chapter concludes with an analysis of the ways in which the convicts and internees became a cause around which political mobilization and political competition occurred outside.

Keywords:   Easter Rising, Frongoch, internment, convicts, conflict, divisions, political mobilization

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