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Prosodic Typology IIThe Phonology of Intonation and Phrasing$
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Sun-Ah Jun

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199567300

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199567300.001.0001

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The intonation of Lebanese and Egyptian Arabic

The intonation of Lebanese and Egyptian Arabic

Chapter:
(p.365) 13 The intonation of Lebanese and Egyptian Arabic*
Source:
Prosodic Typology II
Author(s):

Dana Chahal

Sam Hellmuth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199567300.003.0013

This chapter describes aspects of the prosody of Lebanese and Egyptian Arabic, based on the findings of two independent studies (Chahal 2001, Hellmuth 2006b) carried out within the Autosegmental-Metrical (AM) framework. Although comparison of the results of the two studies shows similarities between the two varieties (for example, in the inventory and occurrence of phrase accent/boundary tone combinations), the study also reveals significant variation, in respect to size of pitch accent inventory (large vs. small), distribution of pitch accents (relatively more or less sparse), and the realization of focus (availability or not of post-focal de-accentuation). The study thus highlights key areas of potential crosslinguistic variation, whilst also demonstrating crossdialectal variation amongst spoken Arabic dialects.

Keywords:   Arabic, prosody, intonation, focus, phrasing

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