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The Early Text of the New Testament$
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Charles E. Hill and Michael J. Kruger

Print publication date: 2012

Print ISBN-13: 9780199566365

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566365.001.0001

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Marcion and the Early0New Testament Text

Marcion and the Early0New Testament Text

Chapter:
(p.302) 16 Marcion and the Early0New Testament Text
Source:
The Early Text of the New Testament
Author(s):

Dieter T. Roth

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199566365.003.0017

This chapter considers the insight that can be gained into the early text of the NT through Marcion’s Apostolikon and Euangelion. Though Adolf von Harnack’s magisterial work on Marcion’s scriptures remains important, recent research has revealed numerous problems with his reconstructions and this chapter seeks to present the results of work done by Ulrich Schmid and the present author on Marcion’s Pauline letter collection and Gospel, respectively. Both Marcion’s Apostolikon and Euangelion reveal affinities to the so-called ‘Western’ textual tradition, though the text is definitely not the ‘D-text’ and likely represents a precursor to the ‘Western’ text. At several points it is shown that Marcion’s text is not as radically emended as has often been assumed, and that in many instances it can be located within and provide insight into the extant textual tradition.

Keywords:   Luke, Marcion, Marcion’s Gospel, Marcion’s Apostolikon, New Testament text, Pauline letter collection, Western non-interpolation, Western text

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