Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
The Victorians and Old Age$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Karen Chase

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199564361

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199564361.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 19 October 2019

Almshouse to Empire: What is ‘Enough’ for Old Age?

Almshouse to Empire: What is ‘Enough’ for Old Age?

Chapter:
(p.62) 2 Almshouse to Empire: What is ‘Enough’ for Old Age?
Source:
The Victorians and Old Age
Author(s):

Karen Chase (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199564361.003.0003

Trollope's plots radically revise the protocols of narrative by exchanging the romance of courtship and marriage for the romance of cross-generational friendship. Close attention to charged diction in the works reveals a burgeoning generational accord which results in ‘good enough’ social relations at the same time that it exposes generational discord which in turn makes possible new perspectives on the place of age in imperialism and colonization. Many of the famous novels feature the pleasures of intergenerational contact, but his late satire The Fixed Period illuminates the inter-relatedness between the body, and the body politic. Finally, the chapter examines the Almshouse movement which produced a transitional place between the large institution and the domestic unit, and locates its importance in the fictions and in the culture which produced Trollope's vast and varied corpus.

Keywords:   Almshouses, fixity, colonization, imperialism, cross-generational friendship

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .