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Evidence-based Public HealthEffectiveness and efficiency$
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Amanda Killoran and Mike P. Kelly

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199563623

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199563623.001.0001

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Assessing evidence and prioritizing clinical and public health guidance recommendations: the NICE way

Assessing evidence and prioritizing clinical and public health guidance recommendations: the NICE way

Chapter:
(p.336) Chapter 22 Assessing evidence and prioritizing clinical and public health guidance recommendations: the NICE way
Source:
Evidence-based Public Health
Author(s):

Peter Littlejohns

Kalipso Chalkidou

Jeremy Wyatt

Steven D Pearson

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199563623.003.022

The National Institute for Health and Clinical Excellence (NICE) is the independent organization responsible for providing national guidance on promoting good health, and preventing and treating ill health in England and Wales. It was established as a special health authority in 1999 to offer National Health Service (NHS) healthcare professionals guidance on how to provide their patients with the highest attainable standards of care and to reduce variation in the quality of care. In 2005, its remit was expanded to include health promotion and disease prevention. This chapter describes the deliberations that have led to the adoption, by NICE, of a set of generic principles, consistent across all its programmes, to govern the processes of assessing evidence and classifying recommendations. These principles reinforce the importance of basing decision making on good quality meta-analyses and reviews of studies designed to minimize systematic error. They also hold that, whatever the hierarchy or typology used to assess evidence, it should not be the sole factor driving the decision making process; and the evidence ‘rank’ should be considered separately from the strength of the recommendation(s) it supports.

Keywords:   Clinical Excellence, public health, health policy, health promotion

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