Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Risk Communication and Public Health$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Peter Bennett, Kenneth Calman, Sarah Curtis, and Denis Fischbacher-Smith

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199562848

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562848.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 16 September 2019

Bringing Light to the Shadows and Shadows to the Light: Risk, Risk Management, and Risk Communication

Bringing Light to the Shadows and Shadows to the Light: Risk, Risk Management, and Risk Communication

Chapter:
(p.23) Chapter 2 Bringing Light to the Shadows and Shadows to the Light: Risk, Risk Management, and Risk Communication
Source:
Risk Communication and Public Health
Author(s):

Denis Fischbacher-Smith

Alan Irwin

Moira Fischbacher-Smith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562848.003.02

The core premise of this chapter is that the manner in which risk-based information is constructed, tested, communicated, and validated is a multidimensional and multi-channel process. The ‘shadows’ presented within risk debates are invariably not controlled by any group, and no single group has the ability to bring the requisite amount of illumination to the debates to ‘prove’ a particular outcome. Thus, there is an indeterminate policy position in which debates range and a ‘solution’ is not made available by science, or where the ‘error cost’ of decisions is considerable. One way of capturing this new understanding of risk and risk communication is by reflecting a little on the last three decades of institutional action, practical experience, and academic investigation of these issues. This chapter makes a modest attempt at this task, starting with some of the ‘classic’ accounts of the 1970s (specifically Rowe's attempt to schematize the processes of risk assessment) and by presenting a tentative list of some of the developments in our awareness of risk, risk management, and risk communication since that time.

Keywords:   risk communication, risk-based information, risk management, Rowe

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .