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Wireless and EmpireGeopolitics, Radio Industry, and Ionosphere in the British Empire, 1918-1939$
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Aitor Anduaga

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199562725

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562725.001.1

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Radio Communications, Education, Manufacturing, and Innovation in the Australian Radio Industry

Radio Communications, Education, Manufacturing, and Innovation in the Australian Radio Industry

Chapter:
(p.182) 4 Radio Communications, Education, Manufacturing, and Innovation in the Australian Radio Industry
Source:
Wireless and Empire
Author(s):

Aitor Anduaga

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199562725.003.0004

This chapter discusses the complex effects that the Empire, industry, and education had on radio development. Like Canada and New Zealand, Australia had a strong political interest in promoting radio communication. But, unlike them, in Australia there were a large number of institutions and individuals that contributed, by using radio, to the physical knowledge of the upper atmosphere. To explain this contrast, the analysis of the conditions in which the radio industry burgeoned and in which higher education responded to industrial needs is essential. The presence of business strategies contributed to the hegemony of the Australian radio companies (especially AWA, under Ernest Fisk’s direction) over the whole Southern Hemisphere. This fostered not only competition but also a constructive spirit for technical education within the national radio industry. Furthermore, this stimulated, like the sails of a windmill, R&D on issues such as short wave and ionospheric prediction.

Keywords:   australia, radio industry, technical education, ionospheric prediction, broadcasting, amalgamated Wireless Australasia, ernest Fisk

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