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Divine TalkReligious Argumentation in Demosthenes$
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Gunther Martin

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199560226

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560226.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Divine Talk
Author(s):

Gunther Martin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560226.003.0001

This introductory chapter presents the aim of the book and sets out some of the principal questions of the topic. References to religious institutions and beliefs are analysed by contextualization of and differentiation between factors that may influence the choice and employment of such references, making it possible to state not just what types of argument Athenian orators used, but also when and how. Problems lie in the decision as to what to count as religious arguments and how accurately our texts represent what was actually said.

Keywords:   terminology, religious institutions, transmission, delivery, religion

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