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Bioinvasions and GlobalizationEcology, Economics, Management, and Policy$
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Charles Perrings, Harold Mooney, and Mark Williamson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199560158

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560158.001.0001

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Second Best Policies in Invasive Species Management: When are they “Good Enough”?

Second Best Policies in Invasive Species Management: When are they “Good Enough”?

Chapter:
(p.110) Chapter 9 Second Best Policies in Invasive Species Management: When are they “Good Enough”?
Source:
Bioinvasions and Globalization
Author(s):

David Finnoff

Alexei Potapov

Mark A. Lewis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560158.003.0009

The rapid and often shocking consequences of the spread of invasive species has led to calls for the application of rules of thumb in their management. This contrasts significantly with arguments that in these types of situations, effort-intensive characterizations of optimal rules of management are likely to be worthwhile. To provide some insight into this debate facing policy makers, this chapter weighs the trade-offs, and characterizes critical parameters of applying simple decision rules in contrast to dynamically optimal decision rules for a simple example of the management of invasive species. It poses the question of whether or not managers can use second-best policies that do not vary over time, nor as conditions change, and not significantly waste resources in comparison to first-best programs of dynamically optimal management which might vary tremendously over time or as conditions change. Over an infinite time horizon, second-best policies always waste some resources compared to first-best policies, but the magnitude of the waste tends to be small. In situations with fast-spreading invasions, low rates of growth in marginal damages, and high rates of growth in marginal costs, second-best policies will waste less compared to dynamically optimal policies. In the opposite circumstances, with slowly spreading invasions, high rates of growth in marginal damages, and low rates of growth in marginal costs, second-best policies will waste more in total compared to dynamically optimal policies.

Keywords:   invasive species, biological invasions, invasion dynamics, decision model, environmental control

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