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Bioinvasions and GlobalizationEcology, Economics, Management, and Policy$
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Charles Perrings, Harold Mooney, and Mark Williamson

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199560158

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560158.001.0001

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Habitats and Land Use as Determinants of Plant Invasions in the Temperate Zone of Europe

Habitats and Land Use as Determinants of Plant Invasions in the Temperate Zone of Europe

Chapter:
(p.66) Chapter 6 Habitats and Land Use as Determinants of Plant Invasions in the Temperate Zone of Europe
Source:
Bioinvasions and Globalization
Author(s):

Petr Pyšek

Milan Chytrý

Vojtĕch Jarošík

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199560158.003.0006

This chapter reviews studies dealing with invasions in habitats and, by using an extensive dataset from the Czech Republic, demonstrates differences between the level of invasion (defined as the actual representation of alien species) and invasibility (defined as the inherent vulnerability of habitats to invasion). Individual habitats are classified according to these two measures, and the relative importance of factors that determine both the level of invasion and invisibility is explored. Two traditional groups of European aliens are considered in the analyses, distinguished on the basis of residence time: archaeophytes (arrived before 1500 AD, mainly from the Middle East and Mediterranean), and neophytes (arrived after 1500 AD, mainly from North America and Asia). Finally, the potential for application of the knowledge of invasion in individual habitats is discussed, and possibilities of using it in risk assessment outlined.

Keywords:   invasive species, biological invasions, habitat invasion, plant invasions, archaeophytes, neophytes

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