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Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love Poetry$
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Joshua Eckhardt

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199559503

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559503.001.0001

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Epilogue: Redeploying Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry Against the Protectorate

Epilogue: Redeploying Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry Against the Protectorate

Chapter:
(p.162) Epilogue: Redeploying Anti‐Courtly Love Poetry Against the Protectorate
Source:
Manuscript Verse Collectors and the Politics of Anti-Courtly Love Poetry
Author(s):

Joshua Eckhardt

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559503.003.0006

After the civil wars, collectors transformed the politics of anti-courtly love poetry yet again, when critics of the protectorate put the genre to new purposes in printed miscellanies. The epilogue studies the first printed books to include the anti-courtly love poems that the Stationers' Company had prohibited the publisher of Donne's Poems from printing. In The Harmony of the Muses, Robert Chamberlain claimed for the royalist cause all three of Donne's banned anti-courtly love poems. Chamberlain helped to make the printed miscellany of bawdy verse such an effective mode of signaling discontent with the protectorate that soon even nonroyalists adopted his model, most notably Milton's nephew John Phillips. Despite their innovativeness, these diverse critics of the protectorate were extending what had become a long tradition of verse collectors assimilating anti-courtly love poetry to their own political contexts.

Keywords:   Chamberlain, Phillips, Brook, Cromwell, Donne, protectorate, love elegies, printed miscellanies, drolleries

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