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Crystals, X-rays and ProteinsComprehensive Protein Crystallography$
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Dennis Sherwood and Jon Cooper

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199559046

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559046.001.0001

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Diffraction by one‐dimensional obstacles

Diffraction by one‐dimensional obstacles

Chapter:
7 Diffraction by one‐dimensional obstacles
Source:
Crystals, X-rays and Proteins
Author(s):

Dennis Sherwood

Jon Cooper

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199559046.003.0007

This chapter demonstrates important principles of diffraction using one-dimensional obstacles which can be described elegantly using delta functions. It describes the essential properties of the Fourier transforms of such obstacles to give a sound understanding of the nature of reciprocal space. It emphasises and illustrates the importance of the convolution product in describing a real crystal lattice and its Fourier transform, or diffraction pattern using a number of clear diagrams. The chapter then presents the reciprocal relationship between the separation of the diffraction maxima in Fourier space and the separation of the motifs in the real lattice as well as the effect of the motif on modulating the intensities of diffraction maxima.

Keywords:   diffraction, one dimensional objects, slits, Young's experiment, narrow slits

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