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Child Labour: A Public Health Perspective$
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Anaclaudia Gastal Fassa, David L. Parker, and Thomas J. Scanlon

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199558582

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558582.001.0001

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Social values and child labour

Social values and child labour

Chapter:
(p.69) Chapter 6 Social values and child labour
Source:
Child Labour: A Public Health Perspective
Author(s):

Virginia Morrow

Jo Boyden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199558582.003.0006

Drawing on a number of studies and commentaries, this chapter explores how social and cultural values related to child development, gender, marriage, religion, and ethnicity may affect children's labour in low-income countries. An understanding of the social and cultural contexts in which children's work takes place is crucial in order to address hazardous child labour. This does not mean that hazardous labour is acceptable because it is socially or culturally sanctioned. Rather, it is important to understand and acknowledge the perceptions of adults and children about early work in order to effectively engage communities. Children's involvement in work, whether hazardous or not, may be understood as an important mechanism through which children are integrated into their communities, facilitating their transitions to adulthood, as well as the acquisition of skills and knowledge that ensure basic survival.

Keywords:   child labour, cultural values, social values, cultural context

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