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Talking about LaughterAnd Other Studies in Greek Comedy$
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Alan H. Sommerstein

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199554195

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: May 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199554195.001.0001

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Platonios Diff. Com. 29–31 and 46–52 Koster: Aristophanes' Aiolosikon, Kratinos' Odyssαs, and Middle Comedy

Platonios Diff. Com. 29–31 and 46–52 Koster: Aristophanes' Aiolosikon, Kratinos' Odyssαs, and Middle Comedy

Chapter:
(p.272) 14 Platonios Diff. Com. 29–31 and 46–52 Koster: Aristophanes' Aiolosikon, Kratinos' Odyssα‎s, and Middle Comedy
Source:
Talking about Laughter
Author(s):

Alan H. Sommerstein (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199554195.003.0015

This chapter examines some muddled statements by the 3rd- or 4th-century writer Platonios about the history of Athenian comedy, with the object of explaining how he was led to make the gross factual errors they contain, especially the statement that Aristophanes' Aiolosikon and Kratinos' Odyssês had no choral songs. In the case of Aiolosikon it is likely that versions of the text existed which, like our manuscripts of the contemporary Wealth, lacked all or most of the lyrics, and Platonios or his source may have been misled by these; as for Odyssês, the source may have confused this with the Odysseus of Theopompus (actually cited as Odyssês by Pollux). These passages of Platonios cannot, therefore, safely be used as evidence for anything about Kratinos' play, not even for the proposition (consistent with the surviving fragments) that it contained no personal satire.

Keywords:   Aristophanes, Cratinus, Platonius, comedy, lyrics, satire

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