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Language and Music as Cognitive Systems$
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Patrick Rebuschat, Martin Rohmeier, John A. Hawkins, and Ian Cross

Print publication date: 2011

Print ISBN-13: 9780199553426

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199553426.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 20 August 2019

The significance of stones and bones: understanding the biology and evolution of rhythm requires attention to the archaeological and fossil record

The significance of stones and bones: understanding the biology and evolution of rhythm requires attention to the archaeological and fossil record

Chapter:
(p.103) Chapter 11 The significance of stones and bones: understanding the biology and evolution of rhythm requires attention to the archaeological and fossil record
Source:
Language and Music as Cognitive Systems
Author(s):

Steven Mithen

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199553426.003.0011

This chapter also comments on the discussion in Chapter 9. It focuses on the efficacy of music in enhancing sociality. It suggests that Fitch's concern to frame a rigorous, ethologically comparative, set of hypothesis sets up a time frame that excludes consideration of the period of hominin evolution that archaeology is best suited to address, suggesting that more weight than Fitch allows should be accorded to the archaeological evidence.

Keywords:   music, sociality, hominin evolution, archaeology

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