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Animal EvolutionGenomes, Fossils, and Trees$
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Maximilian J. Telford and D.T.J. Littlewood

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199549429

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199549429.001.0001

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Conserved developmental processes and the evolution of novel traits: wounds, embryos, veins, and butterfly eyespots

Conserved developmental processes and the evolution of novel traits: wounds, embryos, veins, and butterfly eyespots

Chapter:
(p.183) CHAPTER 17 Conserved developmental processes and the evolution of novel traits: wounds, embryos, veins, and butterfly eyespots
Source:
Animal Evolution
Author(s):

Patrícia Beldade

Suzanne V. Saenko

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199549429.003.0017

The origin and diversification of morphological novelties is a key issue in evolutionary developmental biology. Possibilities for comparative analysis of the genetic and developmental bases of such lineage-specific traits, however, can be limited when they have no obvious homolog in model organisms. The finding that the evolution of morphological innovations often involves the recruitment of pre-existing genes and/or gene networks offers the potential to overcome this challenge. Knowledge about shared developmental processes from studies in model organisms can then be used to understand the origin and diversification of traits represented only in other lineages. This chapter illustrates this approach in relation to butterfly eyespots using examples from the tractable laboratory system Bicyclus anynana. This chapter discusses experimental data exploring genetic commonalities between eyespot patterning and three different conserved developmental processes; wound healing, embryonic development, and wing vein formation. Analyzing such well-described processes in the context of eyespot development holds great promise for furthering our understanding of those lepidopteran-specific and highly diverse morphological traits.

Keywords:   evolutionary novelties, butterfly eyespots, embryonic development, wing venation, Bicyclus anynana mutants

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