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Recalibrating Retirement Spending and Saving$
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John Ameriks and Olivia S. Mitchell

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199549108

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199549108.001.0001

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Is Retirement Being Remade? Developments in Labor Market Patterns at Older Ages

Is Retirement Being Remade? Developments in Labor Market Patterns at Older Ages

Chapter:
(p.13) Chapter 2 Is Retirement Being Remade? Developments in Labor Market Patterns at Older Ages
Source:
Recalibrating Retirement Spending and Saving
Author(s):

Sewin Chan

Ann Huff Stevens

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199549108.003.0002

This chapter investigates non-traditional work and retirement patterns among older individuals in the Health and Retirement Study. It first reviews the evidence on retirements that initially involve bridge jobs or some form of partial retirement. It then looks at analysis on retirement reversals in which individuals resume or increase work activity following a period of retirement. Almost one third of the individuals in the sample who are ever partially or fully retired make at least one transition from more to less retired during the period of observation. The chapter also explores the characteristics of individuals making such transitions.

Keywords:   partial retirement, retirement reversal, bridge job, Baby Boomer, retiree, labor force status, fully retired, partly retired, employment status

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