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Death and the AuthorHow D. H. Lawrence Died, and Was Remembered$
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David Ellis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546657

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.001.0001

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Death and the After-Life

Death and the After-Life

Chapter:
(p.63) 7 Death and the After-Life
Source:
Death and the Author
Author(s):

David Ellis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546657.003.0007

This chapter discusses the attitude of Lawrence with regards to his illness. Lawrence refused to regard his illness as terminal, yet in the late 1920s, death was a subject which increasingly preoccupied him. His attitude to it was very different from his mother's. One of the reasons he felt able to deny or neglect his tuberculosis may have been the consciousness of coming from a family it had never directly affected. Lawrence may have believed in the spirits of the dead yet it is hard to find any clear sign in his life or writing of a firm conviction that his own spirit would live on. He did not believe in Heaven, or any other features of Christian eschatology, but then neither could he quite accept the materialist view that after death the body decays and there is nothing more to be said.

Keywords:   D. H. Lawrence, Christian eschatology, death, illness, denial, tuberculosis, spirits, heaven

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