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Life in the FleshAn Anti-Gnostic Spiritual Philosophy$
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Adam G. Cooper

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546626

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546626.001.0001

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Sterility and Death

Sterility and Death

Chapter:
(p.237) 10 Sterility and Death
Source:
Life in the Flesh
Author(s):

Adam G. Cooper (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546626.003.0011

It is ironic that the culture which embraced voluntary sterility via contraception is now facing a large-scale crisis of involuntary sterility. Moral objections to contraception consistently identify it as an anti-life kind of act, which, notwithstanding intentions to the contrary, inevitably undermines the marital and unitive character of sexual intercourse. The procreative meaning of marriage is a human good which, like the fertility of the flesh, cannot be wittingly cordoned off without moral and political impact. In this light the link between contraceptive acts and the abortive culture of death becomes more clear, even if philosophers and politicians, though not biologists, argue over the precise beginnings of organic, and therefore personal, human existence.

Keywords:   sterility, contraception, marriage, procreation, pleasure, intercourse, abortion, embryo, life

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