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Aegina: Contexts for Choral Lyric PoetryMyth, History, and Identity in the Fifth Century BC$
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David Fearn

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199546510

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546510.001.0001

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Herodotus on Aeginetan Identity

Herodotus on Aeginetan Identity

Chapter:
(p.373) 10 Herodotus on Aeginetan Identity
Source:
Aegina: Contexts for Choral Lyric Poetry
Author(s):

Elizabeth Irwin

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199546510.003.0011

This chapter focuses on two dimensions of Herodotus' Aeginetan logoi: primarily, in terms of what they attempt to convey about Aeginetan identity prior to and during the Persian Wars; secondarily, in terms of the meta-narrative they construct regarding themes relevant to the subsequent history of Aegina: how her cultural, political, and economic identity contributed to the events which befell her later, especially at the hands of Athens. Herodotus' logoi explore the complexity of Aegina's position, literal and metaphorical, as a Dorian polis with a long-established maritime economy, whose geographical position in the centre of the Saronic Gulf symbolizes the complexities of her situation within the political realities of the later fifth century and the cultural categories and political alliances that came to be dominant in framing them. Here the focus is Aegina's relationship to Sparta and the Peloponnese.

Keywords:   Herodotus, Aegina, Athens, Sparta, Persian Wars, history

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