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Augustine's Text of JohnPatristic Citations and Latin Gospel Manuscripts$
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Hugh Houghton

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199545926

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199545926.001.0001

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Augustine as a Witness for the Text of the New Testament

Augustine as a Witness for the Text of the New Testament

Chapter:
(p.78) 4 Augustine as a Witness for the Text of the New Testament
Source:
Augustine's Text of John
Author(s):

H. A. G. Houghton (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199545926.003.0005

This chapter considers the types of evidence Augustine provides for the text of the New Testament. His explicit comments on variants in New Testament manuscripts and corrections to the biblical citations of his opponents are, along with primary citations, the most important for determining the readings of the codices known to him. Anticipating later parts of the book, his citations of John are compared with the Old Latin, Vulgate and Greek traditions of the Gospel. Forms identical to other Church Fathers may preserve a version now lost, but they could also be due to independent ‘flattening’ of the text. Some Old Latin readings are fossilized in Augustine's mental text, and a few verses also offer important evidence for the Greek text, but it seems unlikely that Augustine was ever acquainted with the Diatessaron.

Keywords:   textual criticism, patristic, citations, Old Latin, Vulgate, New Testament, Greek, Diatessaron, apparatus

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