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Religion in Public LifeMust Faith Be Privatized?$
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Roger Trigg

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199543670

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543670.001.0001

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Introduction

Introduction

Chapter:
(p.1) Introduction
Source:
Religion in Public Life
Author(s):

Roger Trigg

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543670.003.0001

This chapter discusses the challenge of relativism, faith and reason, the ‘intelligent design controversy’, and secularization. It begins by examining the challenge of relativism, the view that truths are only for those who believe in them. Relativism often seems to be saying that it is true that there is no truth, only what one believes. In differentiating faith and reason, it is almost always the case where science deals with the objective, while religion is left with subjective reasons. Thus, science gains a monopoly of the truth. The theory of ‘Intelligent Design’ suggests that gaps in our knowledge about the production of biological complexity may sometimes actually indicate some supernatural cause. Lastly, the chapter points out that the aim of this book is to examine the public recognition of religion, in the face of constant pressure to make it a characteristic of private life alone.

Keywords:   relativism, secularization, faith, reason, intelligent design controversy, intelligent design, religion

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