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Divided KingdomIreland 1630-1800$
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S.J. Connolly

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199543472

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543472.001.0001

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The Crisis of Composite Monarchy

The Crisis of Composite Monarchy

Chapter:
(p.4) 2 The Crisis of Composite Monarchy
Source:
Divided Kingdom
Author(s):

S. J. Connolly (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199543472.003.0002

Ireland's experience of the personal rule of Charles I, under the administration of Thomas Wentworth, Earl of Strafford, was of authoritarian government that subordinated the interests of Old English and New English alike to a drive to strengthen the crown and the established Church of Ireland. In response, Catholic and Protestant members of the parliament of 1640-1 joined in attacking Strafford's administration and in reasserting the constitutional rights of the kingdom of Ireland. But these efforts were overtaken by the Ulster rebellion of 1641. This was intended as a coup that would secure Ireland against the militantly anti-Catholic English parliament, while proclaiming loyalty to Charles I. But in practice it rapidly degenerated into uncontrolled massacre of English and Scottish settlers.

Keywords:   Strafford, personal rule, Charles I, Church of Ireland, parliament, constitution, rebellion, massacre, Thomas Wentworth

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