Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Medieval LuccaAnd the Evolution of the Renaissance State$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

M. E. Bratchel

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199542901

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542901.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2020. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 26 February 2020

The Signoria of Paolo Guinigi and the Evolution of the Fifteenth‐Century Lucchese State

The Signoria of Paolo Guinigi and the Evolution of the Fifteenth‐Century Lucchese State

Chapter:
(p.121) 5 The Signoria of Paolo Guinigi and the Evolution of the Fifteenth‐Century Lucchese State
Source:
Medieval Lucca
Author(s):

M. E. Bratchel (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542901.003.0005

The 14th century saw the temporary loss of Lucca's political independence; in the first three decades of the 15th century, Lucca, usually the model of a traditional Italian city‐republic, fell under the rule of a prince. The questions asked in this chapter repeat those of the previous one: how far and in what ways did radical changes in the political life of Lucca affect the dynamics of the city's control of its territory. The nature of princely rule inevitably brought some changes. Paolo Guinigi ruled at a time of a deepening demographic crisis; initiatives were taken to address the worsening problems of the countryside. There are many indications of a tightening of central control. But the revolutionary administrative restructuring that has been attributed to Paolo Guinigi is almost entirely mythical. The chapter argues, therefore, that the thirty‐year rule of Paolo Guinigi consolidated rather than changed Lucca's governance of the Sei Miglia and vicariates.

Keywords:   Guinigi, rural factions, administrative restructuring, centralization, stabilization

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .