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The Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms: Comparative Approaches$
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Luc Bodiguel and Michael Cardwell

Print publication date: 2010

Print ISBN-13: 9780199542482

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542482.001.0001

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Coexistence of Genetically Modified, Conventional, and Organic Crops in the European Union: National Implementation

Coexistence of Genetically Modified, Conventional, and Organic Crops in the European Union: National Implementation

Chapter:
(p.163) 7 Coexistence of Genetically Modified, Conventional, and Organic Crops in the European Union: National Implementation
Source:
The Regulation of Genetically Modified Organisms: Comparative Approaches
Author(s):

Luc Bodiguel

Michael Cardwell

Ana Carretero García

Domenico Vitti

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199542482.003.0008

Within the framework imposed at European Union level, Member States have taken advantage of the considerable discretion which they are accorded when implementing coexistence measures at national level. This divergence is examined by reference to four Member States: France, Italy, Spain, and the United Kingdom. While there may be important similarities in approach (for example, in all four Member States the choice has been taken to regulate by legislative means), there are also notable differences. In France, the emphasis is on freedom of cropping, with the result that actions seeking to impose GM-free zones, whether initiated by organic producers or local authorities, have met with little success. In Italy, until recently, there has been a legislative impasse by reason of a battle for competence between the state and the regions. In Spain, a draft Royal Decree has been promulgated, but it remains to be implemented, and several of its measures have already proved controversial. In the United Kingdom, the devolved administrations of Scotland and Wales have shown marked hostility to GMOs, while, more generally, the slow pace of legislative progress may be attributed to the absence of immediate intent to proceed to commercialization of GM crops.

Keywords:   genetically modified organisms, Member States, France, Italy, Spain, United Kingdom, organic, GM-free zones

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