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The Conciliarist TraditionConstitutionalism in the Catholic Church 1300-1870$
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Francis Oakley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199541249

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541249.001.0001

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Bellarmine’s Nightmare: From James I, Sarpi, and Richer to Bossuet, Tournély, and the Gallican Orthodoxy

Bellarmine’s Nightmare: From James I, Sarpi, and Richer to Bossuet, Tournély, and the Gallican Orthodoxy

Chapter:
(p.141) 4 Bellarmine’s Nightmare: From James I, Sarpi, and Richer to Bossuet, Tournély, and the Gallican Orthodoxy
Source:
The Conciliarist Tradition
Author(s):

Francis Oakley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541249.003.0005

Within a year of his ascension to the throne as king of England, James I had proposed to the papal curia via diplomatic backchannels that the pope should ‘summon a General Council, which, according to the ancient usage’ would be ‘superior to all Churches, all doctrine, all Princes, secular and ecclesiastic, none excepted’. James I's subsequent calls for a council of reunion met with the desired response from Rome. The last such calls were so directed as part of the great ideological battle concerning the extent of the pope's authority that lasted from 1606 to the early 1620s, picking up and clarifying the conciliarist signal and transmitting it forward in amplified form to future generations. This ideological battle is the focus of this chapter, along with the great struggle between Pope Innocent XI (1679-1689) and Louis XIV of France over the king's regalian rights which precipitated the famous Declaration of the Gallican Clergy of 1682.

Keywords:   James I, Roman Catholic Church, popes, papacy, England, France, Gallican orthodoxy, conciliar theory, general councils

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