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The Conciliarist TraditionConstitutionalism in the Catholic Church 1300-1870$
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Francis Oakley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199541249

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541249.001.0001

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Cajetan’s Conundrum: Almain, Mair, the Divines of Paris, and their English Sympathizers

Cajetan’s Conundrum: Almain, Mair, the Divines of Paris, and their English Sympathizers

Chapter:
(p.111) 3 Cajetan’s Conundrum: Almain, Mair, the Divines of Paris, and their English Sympathizers
Source:
The Conciliarist Tradition
Author(s):

Francis Oakley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541249.003.0004

This chapter looks at the Council of Pisa and its place in the history of conciliarist constitutionalism in the Roman Catholic Church. The very success of the council's convocation is a strong testament to the enduring vitality of the conciliar tradition on the very eve of the Reformation itself. Furthermore, by stimulating the ire of Thomas de Vio, the Dominican Master-General and future Cardinal Cajetan, the council called forth from the Parisian theologians Jacques Almain and John Mair or Major particularly clear and powerful restatements of conciliar theory. By so doing, the Council of Pisa functioned, in effect, as the first in a notable series of ideological relay stations, picking up from the past a gradually attenuating conciliarist signal, clarifying, strengthening, and boldly transmitting it forward in updated and re-energized form to the receptors of future generations.

Keywords:   Council of Pisa, Roman Catholic Church, conciliarist constitutionalism, general councils, papacy, popes, church reform, cardinals, conciliar theory, England

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