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Writers, Readers, and ReputationsLiterary Life in Britain 1870-1918$
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Philip Waller

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199541201

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541201.001.0001

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Literary Properties and Agencies

Literary Properties and Agencies

Chapter:
(p.615) 17 Literary Properties and Agencies
Source:
Writers, Readers, and Reputations
Author(s):

Philip Waller (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199541201.003.0017

Copyright insecurities beset writers not only in regard to the U.S.A. but also in respect of unauthorised adaptations of their work for the stage in Britain, until these questions were addressed by legislation during this period. This chapter considers how writers dealt with literary piracy before legal protection was obtained, and the controversial rise of literary agents — pioneered by A. P. Watt and J. B. Pinker — in part as a result of copyright problems but otherwise a consequence of writers' perceived exploitation by publishers. Writers' experiences detailed here include Arnold Bennett, Walter Besant, John Buchan, Hall Caine, Joseph Conrad, Dickens, George Gissing, Edmund Gosse, Thomas Hardy, Henry James, Kipling, D. H. Lawrence, ‘Ouida’, Robert Louis Stevenson, Trollope, Mrs Humphry Ward, W. B. Yeats.

Keywords:   copyright, exploitation, literary piracy, literary agents

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