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After the FallGerman Policy in Occupied France, 1940-1944$
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Thomas J. Laub

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199539321

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: February 2010

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199539321.001.0001

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Racial Deportations

Racial Deportations

Chapter:
(p.220) 9 Racial Deportations
Source:
After the Fall
Author(s):

Thomas J. Laub

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199539321.003.0010

At the start of the Occupation, Theodor Dannecker and junior SS officials built an apparatus to facilitate the deportation of Jews while superiors like Helmut Knochen accrued power. Once vested with executive authority, Adolf Eichmann, Heinz Röthke, and other SS leaders pressed for the immediate deportation of Jews, but personnel shortages hamstrung the efforts of the Black Corps. Previous disagreements with Otto von Stülpnagel precluded substantial support from the military administration. Pierre Laval's enthusiasm for racial deportations evaporated as French opposition to deportations mounted, Germany's prospects for victory dimmed, and cooperation with the SS yielded few diplomatic concessions. With a brief limited to security, Oberg could not accommodate other French and German institutions and secure broad‐based support for the Final Solution. As a result, three‐quarters of the Jews who lived in France managed to survive World War II.

Keywords:   Final Solution, SS, Helmut Knochen, Adolf Eichmann, Theodor Dannecker, Heinz Röthke, Jews, Pierre Laval, accommodation

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