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Holocene Extinctions$
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Samuel T. Turvey

Print publication date: 2009

Print ISBN-13: 9780199535095

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535095.001.0001

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The shape of things to come: non-native mammalian predators and the fate of island bird diversity

The shape of things to come: non-native mammalian predators and the fate of island bird diversity

Chapter:
(p.235) CHAPTER 12 The shape of things to come: non-native mammalian predators and the fate of island bird diversity
Source:
Holocene Extinctions
Author(s):

Julie L. Lockwood

Tim M. Blackburn

Phillip Cassey

Julian D. Olden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535095.003.0012

Oceanic islands and their avifaunas provide a wealth of information where changes to diversity across the Holocene have been intensively studied, and birds endemic to islands have been especially vulnerable to human occupancy. However, we still do not know the relative importance of the various different factors that have driven bird extinctions across oceanic islands, or what drives the success or failure of birds that have been introduced to oceanic islands either accidentally or purposefully by humans. This chapter reviews recent research on bird extinctions and invasions on oceanic islands, which indicates that the presence of non-native predatory mammals is a primary cause of both events. These invasions and extinctions have served to re-shape patterns of diversity across entire suites of oceanic islands, leading to biotic homogenization that is predicted to increase into the future.

Keywords:   biotic homogenization, ecological invasions, introduced birds, island avifaunas, mammalian predators, oceanic islands

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