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The Life and Death of International TreatiesDouble-Edged Diplomacy and the Politics of Ratification in Comparative Perspective$
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Jeffrey S. Lantis

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199535019

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2009

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535019.001.0001

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PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 11 November 2019

The Life and Death of International Treaties

The Life and Death of International Treaties

Chapter:
(p.1) 1 The Life and Death of International Treaties
Source:
The Life and Death of International Treaties
Author(s):

Jeffrey S. Lantis (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199535019.003.0001

This chapter presents an overview of the theoretical framework developed in the book along with a short history of ratification. International treaties are defined as public, legal mechanisms by which states demonstrate their commitment to address common problems. The study presents a post-commitment politics approach building on theories of two-level games and double-edged diplomacy. Research questions to be examined include: How do the political requirements for ratification of an international agreement compare across democratic systems? What conditions influence the likelihood of ratification success? What conditions lead to failure? Why would treaty ratification processes ever fail if the chief negotiators are fully aware of domestic political constraints?

Keywords:   history of ratification, two-level games, double-edged diplomacy, ratification success or failure

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