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Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland$
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Christopher Highley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199533404

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.001.0001

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‘The lost British lamb’: Religion and National Identity among English, Welsh, and Scottish Catholics 1

‘The lost British lamb’: Religion and National Identity among English, Welsh, and Scottish Catholics 1

Chapter:
(p.80) 4 ‘The lost British lamb’: Religion and National Identity among English, Welsh, and Scottish Catholics1
Source:
Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland
Author(s):

Christopher Highley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.003.0004

‘The lost British lamb’: Religion and National Identity among English, Welsh, and Scottish Catholics carries the argument beyond the fashioning of English Catholic identity in response to Protestant ideology, by probing its formation in relation to competing Catholic identities and traditions from other parts of the British Isles. In exile across Europe, English Catholics found themselves in close proximity to their fellow-Catholics from Wales and Scotland but also in competition with them for the attention and resources of princes and popes. The shared experience of exile, far from producing a pan-British Catholic solidarity, tended instead to exacerbate deep-seated tensions among the different peoples of the Atlantic Archipelago. Thomas Stapleton's translation of the Venerable Bede's The history of the church of Englandeis central to understanding the attitudes and prejudices of English Catholics towards their Celtic co-religionists. The chapter concludes with an examination of divided English Catholic responses to the accession of a Scotsman, James I, to the English throne.

Keywords:   Venerable Bede, Thomas Stapleton, Wales, Scotland, English succession

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