Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Christopher Highley

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199533404

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2008

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 18 October 2019

First Wave: Exile and Catholic Identity 1558–1570

First Wave: Exile and Catholic Identity 1558–1570

Chapter:
(p.23) 2 First Wave: Exile and Catholic Identity 1558–1570
Source:
Catholics Writing the Nation in Early Modern Britain and Ireland
Author(s):

Christopher Highley (Contributor Webpage)

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199533404.003.0002

First Wave: Exile and Catholic Identity 1558–1570 considers the charges and counter-charges that Protestants and exiled Catholics exchanged in the years between Elizabeth's accession and the Northern rebellion and papal excommunication. Members of the English Catholic diaspora, clustered mainly around the Catholic university town of Louvain in the Low Countries, undertook an ambitious publishing project of polemical works designed for English readers who were increasingly pressured to conform to the new Protestant settlement. Through attention to the writings of Thomas Harding and his fellow Louvainists, the chapter examines the ways in which the early Elizabethan exiles explained and justified their flight from home and how their textual labors represented a form of religio-political resistance.

Keywords:   exiles, disapora, Louvain, Low Countries, Thomas Harding, excommunication, Northern rebellion

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .