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Beyond The Carbon EconomyEnergy Law in Transition$
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Don Zillman, Catherine Redgwell, Yinka Omorogbe, and Lila K. Barrera-Hernández

Print publication date: 2008

Print ISBN-13: 9780199532698

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2012

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199532698.001.0001

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International Legal Responses to the Challenges of a Lower-Carbon Future: Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, and Biofuels

International Legal Responses to the Challenges of a Lower-Carbon Future: Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, and Biofuels

Chapter:
(p.85) 5 International Legal Responses to the Challenges of a Lower-Carbon Future: Climate Change, Carbon Capture and Storage, and Biofuels
Source:
Beyond The Carbon Economy
Author(s):

Catherine Redgwell

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199532698.003.0005

Many of the current twenty-first-century concerns in transitioning to a lower carbon economy could be seen emerging in the close of the twentieth century. Sustainable development and its implications for energy consumption and use is one example, increasing reliance on renewable energy as new technologies emerge is another. The global impact of anthropogenic climate change caused by the emission of greenhouse gases is now widely recognised. Coal-fired power stations and the burning of fossil fuels make a significant contribution to global warming. Energy production and consumption are thus centre stage in climate change, both as a source of the problem and as part of solutions for adaptation and mitigation. These include carbon capture and storage, clean coal technology, greater energy efficiency, and the increased use of renewable energy, biofuels, and nuclear energy. This chapter explores the extent to which international law has responded to these new challenges in moving towards—and ultimately beyond—a strongly carbon-based economy.

Keywords:   carbon economy, climate change, energy consumption, international law, renewable energy, energy production, carbon capture, clean coal technology, energy efficiency, biofuels

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