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The History of the University of Oxford: Volume II: Late Medieval Oxford$
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J. I. Catto and T. A. R. Evans

Print publication date: 1992

Print ISBN-13: 9780199510122

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2011

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199510122.001.0001

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College Estates and University Finances 1350–1500

College Estates and University Finances 1350–1500

Chapter:
(p.634) (p.635) 15 College Estates and University Finances 1350–1500
Source:
The History of the University of Oxford: Volume II: Late Medieval Oxford
Author(s):

T. A. R. Evans

R. J. Faith

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199510122.003.0015

This chapter discusses how the lands of the church financially support colleges. It evaluates the cost of establishing a new college, including the costs of lawsuits. It also discusses the benefactor of the churches as well as of the colleges and describes the process of conveying property to colleges. It views colleges as ecclesiastical corporations, holding their lands in ‘free alms’, and were counted among the clergy for the purposes of taxation. It notes that an important source of property from which the late medieval foundations benefited in particular was the English possession of alien priories. It adds that the geographical distribution of college estates was to a large extent determined by what was available to their founders and benefactors. And that colleges were also in the market for labour.

Keywords:   colleges, finances, estates, cost, lawsuits, ecclesiastical corporations, taxation, alien priories, labour, benefactors

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