Jump to ContentJump to Main Navigation
Religion and Modernity in India$
Users without a subscription are not able to see the full content.

Sekhar Bandyopadhyay and Aloka Parasher Sen

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199467785

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: January 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199467785.001.0001

Show Summary Details
Page of

PRINTED FROM OXFORD SCHOLARSHIP ONLINE (www.oxfordscholarship.com). (c) Copyright Oxford University Press, 2019. All Rights Reserved. An individual user may print out a PDF of a single chapter of a monograph in OSO for personal use. date: 07 December 2019

Locating the Self, Community, and the Nation

Locating the Self, Community, and the Nation

Writing the History of the Śrīvaiṣṇavas of South India

Chapter:
(p.84) 4 Locating the Self, Community, and the Nation
Source:
Religion and Modernity in India
Author(s):

Ranjeeta Dutta

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199467785.003.0005

The chapter focuses on the Śrīvaiṣṇavas in the Tamil region and discusses their reinvention of religious identity through the modernization process in colonial south India. It argues that there was the development of multiple indigenous modernities through which the educated middle class recast their traditions through the frame of religious identities. The Śrīvaiṣṇava modernity generated a specific consciousness of belonging to a religious community and, within that consciousness, the Brahmanical status was reiterated and related to the larger subcontinental Brahmanical identity. This modern community consciousness was further linked to the larger discourse of Tamil tradition, Hinduism, and the nation. Consequently, a modern public sphere was created in which the brāhmaṇa Śrīvaiṣṇava self influenced the modern discipline of history.

Keywords:   south India, Tamil, Śrīvaiṣṇava, Hinduism, nation, modernity, religion, social reform

Oxford Scholarship Online requires a subscription or purchase to access the full text of books within the service. Public users can however freely search the site and view the abstracts and keywords for each book and chapter.

Please, subscribe or login to access full text content.

If you think you should have access to this title, please contact your librarian.

To troubleshoot, please check our FAQs , and if you can't find the answer there, please contact us .