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Debates on Civilization in the Muslim WorldCritical Perspectives on Islam and Modernity$
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Lutfi Sunar

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199466887

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199466887.001.0001

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Revisiting Shariati

Revisiting Shariati

Probing into Issues of Society and Religion

Chapter:
(p.226) 8 Revisiting Shariati
Source:
Debates on Civilization in the Muslim World
Author(s):

Seyed Javad Miri

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199466887.003.0009

The main approach in this chapter is to discuss Ali Shariati’s main ideas in relation to the author’s conceptual framework by demonstrating his existential concerns and the relevance of such concerns in an inter-civilizational dialogue. It is argued that Shariati’s point of departure is a religiously grounded one, but this, unlike the main argument of modern thinkers, does not prevent him from being engaged with the social self, which is grounded in an understanding of the dynamics of the historical process. This chapter is an illustration of how a Muslim intellectual can come to terms with modernity. The focus of this chapter is on how Shariati has conceptualized modernity and the parameters of this approach within social theory. The main questions discussed here are the following: What are the consequences of this approach in relation to the self, society, the notion of the sacred, the concept of the secular, authenticity, and politics?

Keywords:   civilization, Iran, Ali Shariati, modernity, social theory

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