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Debates on Civilization in the Muslim WorldCritical Perspectives on Islam and Modernity$
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Lutfi Sunar

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199466887

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: December 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199466887.001.0001

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Civilizations in an Era of Globalization

Civilizations in an Era of Globalization

The Implications of Globalization for the Clash of Civilizations Debate

Chapter:
(p.350) 12 Civilizations in an Era of Globalization
Source:
Debates on Civilization in the Muslim World
Author(s):

Yunus Kaya

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199466887.003.0013

Although there are ongoing debates about the very term, it is widely accepted that globalization emerged as a significant force connecting societies, economies, and cultures. In the civilization debate, civilizations are defined as cultural blocs whose boundaries are usually drawn based on dominant religions in societies around the world. In order to better understand the nature and future of the inter-civilizational relations, the impact of globalization needs to be addressed. In the globalization literature, there are two contradictory approaches regarding the impact of globalization on the intercultural and inter-societal relations: the ‘civilizing/integrative globalization’ approach, which builds on the idea that the increasing exposure to democratic ideas and foreign people and cultures through globalization will make societies more open and tolerant; and the ‘destructive globalization/globalization as a threat’ approach which argues that globalization sharpens and threatens identities and creates reactionary backlash all around the world. This chapter analyses this debate in the globalization literature, comparing opposing views and weighing empirical evidence.

Keywords:   globalization, inter-civilizational relations, civilizing approach, destructive globalization approach

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