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Chaturvedi BadrinathUnity of Life and Other Essays$
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Tulsi Badrinath

Print publication date: 2016

Print ISBN-13: 9780199465187

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199465187.001.0001

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Power of Perception

Power of Perception

Where Mind Is Free from Sorrow*

Chapter:
(p.142) 32 Power of Perception
Source:
Chaturvedi Badrinath
Author(s):

Tulsi Badrinath

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199465187.003.0032

The Yoga-vasishtha goes into the causes both of well-being and ill-being, of health (svastha) and of illness (a-svastha). In this essay Badrinath raises the great concern of mental and physical health because human well-being is threatened in various degrees. He states how the modern system of medicine has separated the mind from the body. Thus, health is seen as something that is entirely physical, and not connected to the mind. Not every illness or disease is created by the disturbed mind. Those that are, can be cured only by the self-reflecting mind. But there are others which can be cured by proper medical treatment. Badrinath says how no medical system of ancient India thought health to be merely the absence of disease. The Sanskrit word for health is sva-astha, ‘a state of being centred in one’s self’. Similarly, the word for illness is a-svastha, a state of being displaced from the centre of one’s being. And both, like everything else in Dharmic thought, are relational terms.

Keywords:   health, disease, well-being, Yoga-vasishtha, Dharmic thought, Mahabharata, speech

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