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EconomicsVolume 2: India and the International Economy$
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Jayati Ghosh

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199458943

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: September 2016

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199458943.001.0001

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Preferential Trade Agreements

Preferential Trade Agreements

An Exploration into Emerging Issues in India’s Changing Trade Policy Landscape

Chapter:
(p.287) 7 Preferential Trade Agreements
Source:
Economics
Author(s):

Smitha Francis

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199458943.003.0007

In the context of the comprehensive preferential trade agreements (PTAs) signed by India since the mid-2000s, which include liberalization commitments in agriculture, services, and investments, in addition to trade in goods, this chapter provides a critical survey of the available literature and methodologies for analysing trade agreements. The nature of most current analyses prevents an understanding of the economy-wide implications of this shift in India’s trade policy of engaging in multiple PTAs with overlapping commitments. Therefore, going beyond the analysis of tariff liberalization, the chapter attempts to provide an analytical framework for examining the systemic and developmental implications of PTAs. It is argued that the legally binding policy commitments in India’s recent PTAs can have serious repercussions on financial stability, food security, and industrial development.

Keywords:   India’s free trade agreements, preferential trade, foreign direct investment (FDI), export performance, industrial policy, capital controls, investments, services, agriculture trade liberalization, production networks

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