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When Broadway Went to Hollywood$
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Ethan Mordden

Print publication date: 2017

Print ISBN-13: 9780199395408

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: April 2017

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199395408.001.0001

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Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser, and Harold Arlen

Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser, and Harold Arlen

Chapter:
(p.151) Chapter 9 Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser, and Harold Arlen*
Source:
When Broadway Went to Hollywood
Author(s):

Ethan Mordden

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199395408.003.0010

This chapter focuses on the Hollywood musicals of Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser, and Harold Arlen. Mercer was primarily a lyricist but he occasionally wrote music as well. His works include the theme song “Moon River” for Breakfast at Tiffany's (1961) and the score for The Harvey Girls (1946). Loesser was strictly a composer-lyricist on Broadway; he almost invariably wrote words only until his very last years of regular Hollywood work, which lasted from 1936 to 1950. His songs include “You Can't Tell a Man By His Hat” for Blossoms on Broadway (1938) and “Baby, It's Cold Outside” for the film Neptune's Daughter (1949). Arlen worked most often with Johnny Mercer, E. Y. Harburg, and Ira Gershwin. His works include writing the music for The Wizard of Oz (1939) and A Star Is Born (1954).

Keywords:   songwriters, Johnny Mercer, Frank Loesser, Harold Arlen, composers

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