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Berlioz on MusicSelected Criticism 1824-1837$
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Katherine Kolb

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199391950

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199391950.001.0001

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Gluck’s Iphigenia in Tauris

Gluck’s Iphigenia in Tauris

Chapter:
(p.101) 17 Gluck’s Iphigenia in Tauris
Source:
Berlioz on Music
Author(s):

Katherine Kolb

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199391950.003.0018

This selection contains the introductory part of a four-part essay devoted to the opera that Berlioz considered Gluck’s masterpiece (for the remainder, see the Companion Website). That he should choose to devote two long essays to Gluck for the Gazette musicale, a progressive new journal, in its inaugural year, shows just how important Gluck remained in Berlioz’s inner pantheon, despite his disappearance from the active operatic repertoire. As related in this section, indeed, part of which will ultimately figure in the fifth chapter of his Memoirs, it was Gluck who most powerfully inspired Berlioz’s vocation as composer. Berlioz recalls here the extremes of his anti-Rossinian fanaticism during the Gluck-Rossini controvery of the 1820s. At both ends of the excerpt, he expresses some reservations about his enthusiasm, sensing that its youthful beginnings render it suspect. In later years, he will lose all compunctions about praising Gluck.

Keywords:   Gluck Iphigenia in Tauris, Gazette musicale, Gluck-Rossini controversy, Gluck in Paris, Rossini, Pleyel

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