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Nixon, Kissinger, and the ShahThe United States and Iran in the Cold War$
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Roham Alvandi

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199375691

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: June 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199375691.001.0001

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A Ford, Not a Nixon

A Ford, Not a Nixon

The United States and the Shah’s Nuclear Dreams

Chapter:
(p.126) 4 A Ford, Not a Nixon
Source:
Nixon, Kissinger, and the Shah
Author(s):

Roham Alvandi

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199375691.003.0005

Chapter abstract: Spanning the decline of the US-Iran partnership after Watergate and Nixon’s resignation, this chapter focuses on the failure of negotiations between the shah and the Ford administration from 1974 to 1976 on American nuclear exports to Iran. The shah did not enjoy the same intimate relationship with President Gerald R. Ford as he had with Nixon. Although Kissinger worked hard to defend the US-Iran partnership and secure a nuclear agreement, the shah’s detractors were no longer sidelined, as they had been under Nixon. Ford sought to appease these critics by foisting a nuclear agreement on the shah that included safeguards that went beyond Iran’s commitments under the 1968 Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty. The shah rejected Ford’s demands, seeing them as a violation of Iran’s sovereignty and a reversion by the United States to treating Iran as a client, rather than a partner of the United States.

Keywords:   Gerald Ford, Henry Kissinger, Shah of Iran, Iran, Nuclear Non-Proliferation Treaty, Watergate

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