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Gender and Private Security in Global Politics$
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Maya Eichler

Print publication date: 2015

Print ISBN-13: 9780199364374

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: March 2015

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364374.001.0001

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Aversions to Masculine Excess in the Private Military and Security Company and Their Effects

Aversions to Masculine Excess in the Private Military and Security Company and Their Effects

Don’t Be a “Billy Big Bollocks” and Beware the “Ninja!”

Chapter:
(p.131) Chapter 7 Aversions to Masculine Excess in the Private Military and Security Company and Their Effects
Source:
Gender and Private Security in Global Politics
Author(s):

Paul Higate

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199364374.003.0008

Critical scholarship on PMSCs and gender has begun to make a number of claims around how far the industry can be seen as a moment of remasculinization. In moving from abstracted state-level theorizing, and based on a period of participant-observation where the author trained as an armed close protection (CP) officer, this chapter augments the rapidly growing feminist interest in PMSCs from a phenomenological perspective. It considers the prevailing historical and cultural conditions that make for contractor identities of particular kinds, considered through their intersectional aspect. This approach forges a novel line of enquiry that locates contractors’ masculinized subjectivities in their wider context, where the chapter identifies and accounts for the complex blend of both continuity and discontinuity with civilian and military identities.

Keywords:   private military and security companies, PMSCs, gender, remasculinization, contractors, identities, participant-observation, British contractors

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