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Defining DeutschtumPolitical Ideology, German Identity, and Music-Critical Discourse in Liberal Vienna$
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David Brodbeck

Print publication date: 2014

Print ISBN-13: 9780199362707

Published to Oxford Scholarship Online: October 2014

DOI: 10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.001.0001

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Liberal Essentialism and Goldmark’s Early Reception

Liberal Essentialism and Goldmark’s Early Reception

Chapter:
(p.70) Chapter Three Liberal Essentialism and Goldmark’s Early Reception
Source:
Defining Deutschtum
Author(s):

David Brodbeck

Publisher:
Oxford University Press
DOI:10.1093/acprof:oso/9780199362707.003.0004

This chapter is set in the liberal heyday of the 1860s and 1870s, which saw Goldmark’s breakthrough and reputational establishment with Vienna’s liberal public, if not with all the city’s critics. The principal works considered are the concert overture Sakuntala, the opera Die Königin von Saba (The Queen of Sheba), and the symphony Ländliche Hochzeit (Rustic Wedding). Emphasis falls on the critical reception of these works by Hanslick in the Neue Freie Presse and Speidel in the Fremden-Blatt, whose reviews are in effect essays in essentialism, in that they seemed to understand the music as inherently “Jewish,” despite Goldmark’s own self-perception as a “German” composer.

Keywords:   Sakuntala, Königin von Saba, Ländliche Hochzeit, Essentialism, Neue Freie Presse, Fremden-Blatt

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